Inspiration to Create

It is quite clear that creative industries are a paramount factor of our current economic system. The wide range of careers for someone who wants to be involved in the creative industry workforce includes advertising, architecture, art, crafts, design, fashion, film, music, performing arts, publishing, TV, radio, and video games. These vast professions are considered jobs connected to the notion of creative industries due to the fact of, well simply, the underlying concept of creativity. An individual’s inventiveness from the mind and heart is the sole foundation of how a creative industry functions. In fact, the more imaginative one is, the more prosperous they’ll be in the industry. 

man painting wall

Photo by Megan Markham on Pexels.com

As I read through the several articles that shaped the foundation and pictured the logistics of the creative industry it was rather apparent that someone who is able to adapt in a more responsive manner is more likely to succeed in the creative industry business. In my opinion, as liberal arts students we already have a sense of what it is like to be creative and think outside the box. In my freshman year at Wheaton I was challenged with taking courses that expanded my common knowledge as I indulged myself in a theatre class that I believed would only be superfluous. Now here I am four years later on the verge of graduating with a minor in theatre. Additionally, I was set on the path of business major, however, challenging myself in other classes and recognizing my true passion for the camera and editing, I now sit three months away from graduation ready to major in film.

When I took part in my internship as a production assistant I worked alongside a team of four other members, who were evidently more excelled in production work with regards to film festivals.  This was a new beginning for me, as I was accustomed to the fundamentals of production work, which for me was basic video editing. However, I did have a sense for camera lighting and working with film equipment, whether in front of the camera or behind the camera.

My boss has been to several film festivals throughout the United States, consisting of cities such as Chicago, New York, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, and Seattle. The other team members were also well rehearsed when knowing the essentials of what to do and what not to in regards to production work at a film festival. We were the ones who consisted in the heavy lifting of equipment and assured everything was ready to go when handling well renowned actors and filmmakers. We were constantly faced with several challenges that needed quick responses, as well as team planning in which we would bring to life the festival and make it better than in years past. Taking an initiative by myself when I was faced with a challenge, or when I was in a circumstance in which I needed to react quickly resulted in my team considering me as such a vital part of the whole efforts, than just some intern.

Additionally, at the end of the festival our team had a meeting in which the overall manager stated the team went above and beyond the expectations of previous production teams in the past years. This is a prime example of succeeding in a creative industry. There was so much work needed to be done where we designed new ads, logos, equipment, and respond critically to certain obstacles in our way.

References:

Newbigin, John. “What Is the Creative Economy?” British Council | Creative Economy, 2014, creativeconomy.britishcouncil.org/guide/what-creative-economy.

Parish, David. “Creative Industries Definitions.” David Parish Creative Industries , 19 Dec. 2019, http://www.davidparrish.com/creative-industries-definitions/.

Bridgstock et al: “Creative Graduate Pathways Within and Beyond the Creative Industries” 

Ashton: “Creative Work Careers: Pathways and Portfolios for the Creative Economy” 

Mietzner and Kamprath: “A Competence Portfolio for Professionals in the Creative Industries” 

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