So, what is the “public interest,” anyway?

The 1927 Radio Act is the first place where the phrase “public interest” became tied to media regulation. Throughout Jennifer Holt’s Empires of Entertainment, it also becomes increasingly clear that the phrase has undergone a variety of shifts in meaning and can easily be applied to nearly every media context. Early broadcasters were encouraged by […]

Breaking the Cycle: The Power of Net Neutrality

“So what is the FCC doing today? Quite simply, we are restoring the light-touch framework that has governed the Internet for most of its existence. We’re moving from Title II to Title I. Wonkier it cannot be.” – FCC Chairman Ajit Pai on repealing net neutrality rules. On December 14th 2017, the Federal Communications Commission […]

“You’ve Got to Censor Television, You Fools!”: Why the FCC Regulates Content on Radio and Broadcast TV

One of the things that first struck me when reading Jennifer Holt’s Empires of Entertainment was the key decision the federal government made about cable television in regards to regulation: to regulate it in the same manner as the print and film industries, rather than in the manner of broadcast television and radio. It’s an easy […]

The Monopoly in the Home: Television Regulations – 1950’s to Now

There’s a lot to consider when you talk about the world of entertainment and the companies and conglomerates that run the industries that comprise that world. Jennifer Holt’s book, Empires of Entertainment, touches on many of these industries, their major players, and the history of their regulations and rules. One area that’s been all the […]