Assembly-Line Art

Nearly every century has had its share of creative sparks, but the 20th century somehow managed to produce not only periods of innovation and spectacular creativity, but also sustained high productivity, particularly in industries like music and film. During certain decades of the 1900s, media industries—and their titans—were able to tap into a no-fail formula […]

The Outside Inventor

“The outsider has nothing to lose” (Wu, 20). It is just this mentality that Tim Wu maintains throughout most of his book, The Master Switch, describing the world’s most innovative tech inventors. Wu argues that these creators, the so-called “outside inventors,” function at a distance from business regulations, monetary pressures, and other conditions that affect […]

Ghosting Imagination

Ken Robinson, in his TED talk, “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” makes a crucial distinction between children and adults, highlighting the effects of education on creativity. Robinson claims that children, more than adults, have an expansive imagination and are able to express themselves in more creative ways (Robinson). As we grow, we lose some of our […]

The “Day” Job and the “Real” Job

Since pretty much the beginning of time it’s been the case that artists support themselves with “day” jobs. Even Vincent van Gogh had a number of “day” jobs—he worked as an apprentice to an art dealer, a lay preacher, at a bookstore, and even as a schoolteacher in England (Nix). Teaching is often a route […]